Highbury newsletter: 23 December 2013

Valley Voice

Hard copies of the December 2013 Valley Voice have been delivered to all households in “Lower Highbury”.  For those in “Upper Highbury” here is a link to a PDF: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4AsPP6ZAl99bm40Nl9DOEgtQ1JWY0dhd3pZVVh1ZUxpUFBr/edit?usp=sharing

 

Kaka and lead

Interesting press release from Zealandia about kaka and lead-head nails: http://www.visitzealandia.com/news-item/kakalead/  Take home message: don’t feed kaka unless you want them to get lead poisoning….

 

Cats and native birds

During November there was considerable debate in the Highbury eGroup about the interactions between cats and native birds.  Current best practice is to keep cats indoors during the daytime – when native birds are active and foraging, and let cats out at night when rats and mice are about.  In Australia the advice is to keep cats indoors at night because they have nocturnal marsupials….

 

Plantings near Zealandia fence

Trees that can grow tall pose a threat to the biosecurity of the Zealandia reserve.  Recently plantings of kahikatea have been discovered near the Zealandia boundary fence in George Denton Park.  More details here: http://www.highbury.org.nz/plantings-near-the-zealandia-perimeter-fence/

 

Local venues

Check out the following local eating spots:

Rata Cafe at Zealandia: http://www.visitzealandia.com/what-is-zealandia/the-experience/rata-cafe/

Aro Cafe: http://www.arocoffee.co.nz/the_cafe.html

Kelburn Village Pub: http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/capital-life/restaurant-reviews/4240517/Kelburn-Village-Pub

 

Kelburn Normal School Centenary Celebrations 

Planning is well underway to celebrate 100 years of Kelburn Normal School over the weekend of 16-18 May 2014.  Be part of the celebrations – register your interest now.  Go to: http://www.kelburnnormal.school.nz

 

Emergency preparedness

Do you have a transistor radio and spare batteries?  In a major disaster the power will probably be out – and the only way to get updates will be through a battery powered radio.

 

Music Lessons in Highbury

Get your child off the screen and into the band!

Bassoon lessons are available in Highbury with an experienced teacher and orchestral musician. Suitable for 8 to 15 years.

The bassoon is a terrific woodwind instrument – every orchestra needs two. Worth considering as a second instrument for a keen student who enjoys the piano and wants to give band or orchestra a go, or for a beginner with a bit of potential to go further.

Email: penmiles@gmail.com or phone 475 7101.

 

Messy house? Sounds like you need a cleaner!

Let me help. My name is Brontë Jefferies and I am a “cleaning whiz”. I currently clean several homes in Wellington and am looking to expand my client base.

I am an experienced, hardworking and honest worker, and I can make your home spic and span.

$20 p/h, plus discounts to all those who book me for regular work.

Satisfaction guaranteed.

Call, text or email today.  027 873 2629  brontejefferies@outlook.co.nz

 

Houses for sale in Highbury

Want your friends to move into the best little suburb in Wellington?

18 Disley St: http://www.realestate.co.nz/2145289 or http://www.remax.co.nz/galleryproperties.aspx?LTYPE=R&REGION=5&CITY=22&SUBURB=532 or http://www.nz.open2view.com/properties/303035

 

Newsletter contributions

If anyone wants to contribute a brief news item or article please contact me on skf  [AT] paradise.net.nz.

If you live in the Highbury area and offer products or services that would be of interest to other residents a brief “advert” can be run here!

The general rule is that newsletter items have to about Highbury or relevant to residents.

Highbury Facebook page

Facebook page for Highbury: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Highbury-Wellington-NZ/109783965777035  If you are a Facebooker please “like” it to join the conversation.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

Kris Ericksen

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Plantings near the Zealandia perimeter fence

Posted on behalf of Raewyn Empson

Some recent planting has been undertaken near the boundary fence at Denton Park that is of concern and we don’t know who is responsible but thought we’d provide you with some advice on planting near the fence so that these can be shifted if possible.

The boundary fence is absolutely critical to the security and wellbeing of species within the fence. It is regularly monitored to ensure any damage or potential bridge cause by a branch or tree falling onto the fence is removed as soon as possible to prevent any unwanted pest animals such as possums, rats and stoats climbing over. We also cut back vegetation to prevent animals jumping over the gap onto the fence and/or to prevent potential treefall onto the fence. The latest trials done elsewhere suggest that any vegetation should be at least 5 m away from a fence to prevent animals jumping across onto the fence, and we recommend that any planting done takes into account not just the jumping distance but also the potential height of the tree – if 40m then it should be planted at least 40m away to minimise the risk of it maturing and falling onto the fence sometime in the future.

For these reasons and others, plantings nearby (both inside and outside the fence) need to be an appropriate distance from the fence. Wellington City Council & Zealandia staff have put effort into removing nearby pine trees when resources allow, but much still remains to be done. And we know that as time goes on we will need to more actively manage the native and exotic vegetation adjacent to the fence to increase the gap and minimise future risk – this means that plantings done with the best of intentions may need to be removed. Recent planting within the fence has been undertaken with this in mind and some earlier plantings have been shifted where they are too close to the fence, but more needs to be done.

So, if you are planning to do any planting near the fence please consider the risk it might pose in the future once the plant has matured. The best advice we can give at this stage, is to find out the maximum height of the species you wish to plant, add 5m and plant at least this far away. We are happy to provide specific advise if you want it.

And if you know who planted native trees (including kahikatea) within 5m of the fence, please can you see that these are shifted! Kahikatea can easily grow to 55m, and specimens over 80m have been recorded. The upshot of this is that for most of their active life, these trees would be a very real threat to the habitat that the fence currently protects & will need removing. The same trees planted at an appropriate distance could have a long and healthy life, and will still provide all of the food and habitat resources that they can offer.

Please don’t hesitate to get in contact with us if you need any clarification or additional information.

Many thanks

Raewyn EmpsonConservation Manager

T + 64 4 9209215|  F + 64 4 920 9000

PO Box 9267, Wellington 6141, New Zealand

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Highbury newsletter: 21 October 2013

Kelburn Normal School Centenary Celebrations 

Planning is well underway to celebrate 100 years of Kelburn Normal School over the weekend of 16-18 May 2014.  Be part of the celebrations – register your interest now.  Go to: http://www.kelburnnormal.school.nz

Conservation update from Zealandia

One of the biggest conservation issues facing Zealandia right now at is the continued decline of the bellbird population, despite high productivity. At the end of the breeding season the bellbirds (adults and juveniles) range outside the sanctuary to feed, possibly because there is a greater choice of exotic flowering and fruiting trees outside than inside the sanctuary and many young females in particular are lost to predators during this time. Bellbirds are a key indicator species for the halo project because the sanctuary population appears to be affected by the number of predators outside and it is declining despite our best efforts.

Surveys have been undertaken outside during September to find any nesting pairs of bellbirds so their survival and nest outcomes can be monitored, as a comparison with what happens inside, and within a week 4 females seen at South Karori and the Karori Cemetery have disappeared, at least one associated with a nest failure. This is a pattern we have seen in previous years with nest failure and often loss of the female at the same time and is one of the reasons that bellbirds have been selected as an indicator species for the Halo project – if their survival and recruitment improves and nests outside succeed, then we’ll know that we have made the area around the sanctuary safer for them – its not safe right now.

Zealandia could do with your help – let us know if you see any bellbirds and where so we can try and monitor them (http://www.visitzealandia.com/contact-us/report-a-bird/); get involved in making the neighbourhood safer – set some traps for rats and mustelids in your backyard; report possum sign to council staff and keep your cats indoors during the day. Its important that we make a significant change soon because if not we won’t have enough bellbirds surviving to make a comeback!

Emergency Preparedness

Every household should have a first-aid kit – not only for day-to-day “events” but also for a when a natural disaster occurs.  Linnette Horne has written an article on how to create a low cost first aid kit: http://www.highbury.org.nz/first-aid-kits/

Local History

Parts of Highbury used to be know as Mitchelltown.  Here is an interesting article that outlines the history of Holloway Road and Mitchelltown: http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/local-papers/the-wellingtonian/7891272/Holloway-Rds-nod-to-history

Houses for sale in Highbury

Want your friends to move into the best little suburb in Wellington?

24 Mt Pleasant Rd: http://www.tommys.co.nz/buying/property/T11627-aro-valley

24 Highbury Cres: http://www.tommys.co.nz/buying/property/T11599-highbury

1/32 Koromiko Rd: http://www.realestate.co.nz/1914078 or http://www.remax.co.nz/listing/LDR47844

59 Mt Pleasant Rd section: http://www.remax.co.nz/listing/LDR48952

129 Raroa Rd: http://www.remax.co.nz/listing/LDR48934

Newsletter contributions

If anyone wants to contribute a brief news item or article please contact me on skf  [AT] paradise.net.nz.

If you live in the Highbury area and offer products or services that would be of interest to other residents a brief “advert” can be run here!

The general rule is that newsletter items have to about Highbury or relevant to residents.

Highbury Facebook page

Highbury Facebook page : https://www.facebook.com/pages/Highbury-Wellington-NZ/109783965777035  If you are a Facebooker please “like” it to join the conversation.

Cheers

Kris Ericksen

 

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First aid kits

Posted on behalf of Linnette Horne

First aid kits can be put together, you do not always have to buy a prepackaged one. For those on a restricted income, here are a few suggestions.

You can purchase an airtight container or solid tin box of some sort for a dollar or two. In that you can assemble items one by one.

Bandages don’t have to be purchased. Take an old sheet, (preferably take several of them), you have no idea how much they’ll come in handy (old pillowcases can also be used) boil the items, dry them on an outside clothesline since sunshine is a disinfectant – fold each as small as possible, seal, and you have bandages.

They can be cut up to make bandages of any size required, purchase two cards of small and medium-sized safety pins. Buy a reel of plain sticking plaster, scissors for cutting the sheet can often be found for 20-50c in $2.00 shops

The official list notes sterile non-adhesive pads which are expensive, what is a lot cheaper are sanitary pads, they’re normally also sterile, and a fraction the price. Tuck away a squirt bottle – sipper bottles (with or without plastic straws) work well for this – for washing out eyes filled with dust or for washing out wounds you don’t want to handle and a second bottle that you can use for water with disinfectant. Buy a 2L bottle of disinfectant which when diluted can be used to clean a wound or if more concentrated can be used for cleaning an area for sleeping or first aid.

Add a pair of tweezers, 2-10 pairs of the very light disposable gloves, pen or pencil and small notebook, any form of painkiller you can get that is effective, a small penknife, and a card sealed in plastic that has all emergency numbers for your area.

Do not forget personal medication, at least three months’ worth, and if in doubt check with your doctor. Also do not forget pet medication.

And on that, see if you can do a first aid course. Both NZ Red Cross and St John Ambulance have a variety of courses. They will cover to different levels CPR, medical conditions, and bandaging, Attendees can also be accessed for NZQA units if they wish. Courses can be tailored to attendee’s requirements, so if you are part of say, a special interest group and only want to cover certain subjects, I am sure something can be arranged.

For further information: Red Cross or St John

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Highbury newsletter: September #2 2013

Wellington City Council elections

Local body elections will be happening soon.  To assist you in becoming informed about the candidates standing in the Lambton Ward (within which Highbury is located) John Bishop has listed the web sites of candidates:

http://www.highbury.org.nz/city-council-election-information-about-candidates-in-the-lambton-ward/

 

Kaka

Julia Buck reports on the kaka survey that was undertaken early in 2013: http://www.highbury.org.nz/kaka-doodle-doo/

 

Highbury residents

Chris Manson, a former Koromiko Road resident, is in East Timor with VSA, and is updating his blog on a regular basis: http://vespapower.blogspot.co.nz/

Andy Maloney and Chris Pugsley recently spent six months on Raoul Island, working as volunteers for DOC helping to restore the ecology of the island.  Andy’s blog: http://raoulisland.wordpress.com/

 

Emergency Management: Medications & first aid kit 

If you take prescription medicine, try to have at least a month’s supply available at all times and/or a copy of your prescription, as medical records may be difficult to access in a disaster.

A first aid kit or supplies located in your household is essential.  Things that you should have in a first aid kit are listed here: http://www.gw.govt.nz/first-aid/

 

Aro Street

A fascinating article about the history of Aro St from the Wellingtonian: http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/local-papers/the-wellingtonian/features/7766413/Street-history-Aro-St

 

Summer Vacation Accommodation

There is a place in a Mt Pleasant Rd flat available from mid-November to the end of January ( negotiable).

It is a renovated villa with new kitchen and bathroom. The room has a double bed. The other 2 flatmates are quiet living and

will be absent for some of the time. Please ring or text Hannah on 027 606 4710 for further details.

 

Houses for sale in Highbury

Want your friends to move into the best little suburb in Wellington?

17 Broomhill Road: http://www.tommys.co.nz/buying/property/T10942-your-private-sanctuary

57 Highbury Rd: http://www.tommys.co.nz/buying/property/T10898-seasoned-with-love-and-care

1/32 Koromiko Rd: http://www.realestate.co.nz/1914078 or http://www.remax.co.nz/listing/LDR47844

 

Newsletter contributions

If anyone wants to contribute a brief news item or article please contact me on skf  [AT] paradise.net.nz.

If you live in the Highbury area and offer products or services that would be of interest to other residents a brief “advert” can be run here!

The general rule is that newsletter items have to about Highbury or relevant to residents.

 

Highbury Facebook page

Highbury Facebook page : https://www.facebook.com/pages/Highbury-Wellington-NZ/109783965777035  If you are a Facebooker please “like” it to join the conversation.

Cheers

Kris Ericksen

 

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Kaka doodle–doo!

By Julia Buck

Earlier in 2013 around 200 people took part in an online survey aimed at gathering information about Wellington’s growing kaka population. A small group of us, mainly from Koromiko and Mount Pleasant roads, met at Zealandia to discuss its findings further with four interns from the US who were working on the kaka study.

Residents in the Highbury area are particularly affected by the issue and were major contributors to the survey. We are just over the fence from Zealandia and like it or not, the kaka have spread their wings and moved into our back yards, making themselves very much at home and turning our suburb into Kaka Central!

Fortunately it seems that we are mostly kaka lovers, willing to put up with them dancing on our roofs while chewing the lead tops off roofing nails; sighing only a little to ourselves as they strip apple trees of their fruit and leave the cores littering the ground beneath; persistently waking us up at the crack of dawn; not to mention their raucous, disorderly but utterly joyful behaviour as they whoop and swoop around in the sky.

I learned that kaka don’t build nests, rather they lay their eggs in the nooks and crannies of large trees. You may fnd them settling into family life in the giant macrocarpa tree on the Old Bullock track. They are most visibly around here in the early morning and at the end of the day. We were also advised not to feed them, but to let them do their own foraging for seeds and berries from native trees.

There’s a lot more to find out about kaka and we are hoping that Zealandia and other knowledgeable and observant people will provide us with news of them, as a regular feature of the eGroup newsletter.

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